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Lipid management among individuals with inflammatory arthritis in the national REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

TitleLipid management among individuals with inflammatory arthritis in the national REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsNavarro-Millán, I, Gamboa, CM, Curtis, JR, Safford, MM
JournalJ Int Med Res
Volume46
Issue1
Pagination62-69
Date Published2018 Jan
ISSN1473-2300
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Psoriatic, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Hyperlipidemias, Hypertension, Hypolipidemic Agents, Immunosuppressive Agents, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Spondylitis, Ankylosing, Stroke, United States
Abstract

Objective Hyperlipidemia guidelines do not currently identify inflammatory arthritis (IA) as a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. We compared hyperlipidemia treatment of individuals with and without IA (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis) in a large national cohort. Methods Participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study were classified as having IA (without diabetes or hypertension); diabetes (but no IA); hypertension (but no diabetes or IA); or no IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the odds of medical treatment among those with hyperlipidemia. Results Thirty-nine participants had IA, 5423 had diabetes, 7534 had hypertension, and 5288 had no diabetes, hypertension, or IA. The fully adjusted odds of treatment were similar between participants with IA and those without IA, hypertension, or diabetes. Participants with diabetes and no IA and participants with hypertension and no IA were twice as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Conclusion Despite their higher CVD risk, patients with IA were as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without diabetes, hypertension, or IA. Lipid guidelines should identify IA as a CVD risk factor to improve CVD risk optimization in IA.

DOI10.1177/0300060517713591
Alternate JournalJ. Int. Med. Res.
PubMed ID28701103
PubMed Central IDPMC6011298
Grant ListR01 HL080477 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 NS041588 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States